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The Spice Series – Ginger

Ginger comes from a tropical perennial plant and the part that we actually use is the root!   Ginger holds a very powerful aroma that is sweet and soothing. Dried ginger or ginger  powder lacks the strong aroma but maintains the wonderful flavor.  Ginger is an  interesting spice in that its’ origin is unknown.

 

 

There are 2 ways to harvest ginger: dried or preserved. Here we will be talking about dried ginger. Usually with dried ginger the skin is removed to speed up the drying process, however in the spice trade there are 8 different grades of dried ginger and the different drying processes classify them.

 

 

Ginger is classified as one of the most versatile spices. It can be used for a wide variety of dishes from sweet to savory and is most commonly found in Asian dishes.

It also has a few other jobs. Ginger is used when eating sushi as both a palate cleanser between dishes and it is also said to be able to counter act the negative effects of bad fish.
Ginger is also known to have a soothing affect on an upset stomach. Either way ginger is a delicious and versatile ingredient that we highly recommend integrating into your kitchen. A great dish to start off with is the following recipe by Chef Jean-Philippe.

 

Carrot and Ginger Soup 

  • 3lbs Carrots, peeled and diced
  • 1 Onion, diced
  • 1 Leek, sliced
  • 1 tbsp. fresh ginger, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp. fresh thyme
  • Sea salt
  • Fresh ground white pepper
  • 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 cups water or vegetable stock
  • 1 tbsp. scallion, finely sliced

In a large stainless steel pot heat up 1 tablespoon of olive oil and sweat onion, leek and carrots for 5 minutes over medium hit. Add fresh ginger, garlic, fresh thyme, pinch of sea salt and water. Bring to boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 20 minutes until the
carrots are cook. Put in a blender with 2 tbsp. of butter. Taste and add sea
salt and pepper if necessary. Serve in a soup bowl with scallion for garnish.

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